10. First presidential telephone

President Hayes was the first president to use a telephone while in office. It was installed in the White House in 1879 by none other than Alexander Graham Bell.

9. Multiple Civil War wounds

Hayes was one of five presidents who served in the Civil War, but he was the only one to be wounded in the war. He was wounded on four occasions and had four horses shot from under him.

8. Not in the White House

Hayes’ wife Lucy banned dancing, smoking, alcohol and card playing from the White House. Lucy came to be known as “Lemonade Lucy” for her decision to not serve any alcohol.

7. Hayes started a White House tradition

Hayes and his wife conducted the very first Easter egg roll on the White House lawn. It began a tradition that continues today on the Monday after Easter.

6. First president to go west

Hayes was the first president to visit the West Coast while in office. He visited San Francisco on September 8, 1880.

5. Allowed women in the courtroom

Hayes signed legislation that allowed women to plead cases before the Supreme Court.

4. Hayes won by one vote

Hayes lost the popular vote by about 250,000 but won the electoral vote by one vote.

3. A Congressional commission decided Hayes’ election

The Election of 1876 was highly controversial. The electoral votes from four states were contested and a Congressional commission had to be set up to resolve the dispute. The bi-partisan commission granted the disputed electoral votes to Hayes, giving him the presidency by one vote.

2. Hayes was sworn in secretly

Because of the bitter controversy of  Hayes’ election, the Republicans were worried that the opposing party may try to derail his inauguration. He became the first president to be given the oath of office inside the White House. This occurred in a secret ceremony in the Red Room. Later that same day, he took the oath publicly on the East Portico of the Capitol.

1. Hayes refused to run for a second term

Hayes proposed a one-term limit on the presidency coupled with a six year term. Although his proposal was never enacted, he still kept his pledge to not seek re-election in 1880.