10. Lincoln has no heirs

Although Abraham Lincoln and his wife Mary Todd Lincoln produced four sons, there are no living descendants today. Three of their sons died before the age of twenty. Edward died at the age of four, Willie at twelve and Tad at the age of eighteen. Robert was the only child to live to adulthood and his last known descendant died in 1985.

9. Lincoln’s son was saved by his assassin’s brother

Shortly before his father was assassinated, Robert Lincoln was at at train station where he fell between the platform and the train as the train began to move. He was pulled to safety by a prominent actor of the time named Edwin Booth. Edwin was the brother of John Wilkes Booth, who would later assassinate President Lincoln.

8. Lincoln fought in the Civil War…sort of

Lincoln felt as the leader of the nation’s military, the president should be fighting in the Civil War but obviously couldn’t because of his duties. When J. Summerfield Staples heard this, he volunteered to fight as a substitute for Lincoln. Staples was the son of an Army chaplain and both he and his father fought in and survived the war.

7. Lincoln’s beard was historic

Lincoln was the first president to sport a beard while serving in office.

6. Lincoln was an inventor

Lincoln was the first and only president to ever obtain a patent. He was mechanically inclined and like to take things apart just to see how they worked. In 1849, he got a patent for a device to lift ships over shoals by way of a buoying mechanism. His invention, US Patent No. 6,469 never made it into practical use.

5. Lincoln supported women’s rights

Abraham Lincoln was the first major political figure to suggest extending the right to vote to women. Twelve years before the first woman’s rights convention occurred, Lincoln, then a state legislator, made a statement to an Illinois paper supporting “female suffrage”.

4. Lincoln had the first inaugural photograph

Lincoln was the first president to be photographed at his inauguration. Standing close to Lincoln in the photo is his future assassin, John Wilkes Booth.

3. Lincoln’s son was a Presidential death magnet

Robert Lincoln was close to three separate presidential assassinations. He was invited to Ford Theater the night his father was assassinated. However, he had declined the invitation and remained at the White House instead. He was invited to meet President James Garfield at a train station in Washington, D.C. where he was an eyewitness to Garfield’s assassination. Robert was also invited to a New York fair, where he was present at the time President William McKinley was assassinated.

2. Lincoln had a premonition he would be killed

Not long before he was assassinated, Lincoln spoke of a dream where he heard someone weeping in the White House. When he found the room it was coming from, he asked who had died. He was told it was the president. He approached the coffin to peer in and saw his own face.

1. The Lincoln-Kennedy coincidences

There are several strange coincidences between Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy. Although you can likely find similar coincidences between other presidents if you look hard enough, we’ll leave it up to you to decide whether it’s mere coincidence or something more mysterious. Nevertheless, here they are:

  • Both men were shot in the head on a Friday.
  • Lincoln and Kennedy were elected to Congress 100 years apart. Lincoln was elected in 1846, Kennedy was elected in 1946.
  • Lincoln and Kennedy were elected to the presidency 100 years apart. Lincoln was elected in 1860, Kennedy was elected in 1960.
  • Both men’s successors were named Johnson. Lincoln’s was Andrew Johnson, Kennedy’s was Lyndon Johsnon.
  • Andrew Johnson was born in 1808 while Lyndon Johnson was born in 1908, another 100 year difference.
  • Both men were assassinated by men who were known by three names. Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, Kennedy was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald.
  • The names Lincoln and Kennedy both contain seven letters.
  • The names of their assassins contain fifteen letters.
  • Lincoln was shot in a theater named Ford, Kennedy was shot in a car (a Lincoln) made by Ford.